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Etruscan Terracotta head of a young man
Geneva | Sculpture
 
Date:  2nd Century BC
Culture:  Etruscan
Category:  Sculpture
Medium:  Terracotta
Dimension: H: 18.4
Price: $18,000.00
Provenance: Ex- London Art Market, 2005
Serial No: 18038

This head, whose dimensions are approximately half life-size, was part of the funerary statue of a young man. His neck is slightly stretched forward and his head a bit turned to the right; the asymmetric face (the right side is broader and more finely modeled than the left side) probably indicates that the young man would have been seen in three quarter view from the right.
The beardless, youthful face is thin and oval, with a light, although firm modeling; the eyes are small, the mouth is horizontal, the chin is provided with a dimple. The parted lips and the lowered gaze give the figure a pathetic connotation, which is a distinctive feature of Etruscan funerary statues at that time. This is not an individual portrait, in the strict sense, as attested by the absence of specific personal characteristics; like it is often the case in Greek-Roman antiquity, the funerary statue is not represented with realistic features corresponding to the age of the deceased, but rather in an idealized, almost “Classical” manner.
Stylistically, this head can certainly be attributed to a central Italian workshop; it perfectly reflects the average quality of the figures dated to the 2nd century B.C.